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After all, if every economic issue is framed as a struggle between a hard-working white middle class and undeserving minorities, then workers of all shades will be left fighting for scraps while the wealthy withdraw further into their private enclaves - Barack Obama

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Sengbe
Reply with quote  #1 

A former military officer in the RSLAF is now leading the nation as a civilian President – duly elected. We should all know his name by now, but for those who derided him, and did not believe in his reincarnation as the Father of Democracy in na we Saro, his name is Retired Brigadier General Julius Maada Wonie Bio.

Unu bin say ee nor geh, or do, woke for many years since ee lef State House the forss tem in the 90’s for gee democracy a chance. Well, ee don geh woke now. Haibby-haibby woke for lead the nation again as a civilian. Na the majority of the pipul gee ahm the woke for do dis tem.

The main goal of this piece is to suggest ways his military colleagues can contribute in raising the needed economic capital needed to develop the nation during his tenure as the leader of the nation.

As we all know the military consists of disciplined men and women through their rigorous training in achieving their status as professionals, or at least they should be. I will give them the benefit of any doubts arising from this characterization. After all they are the ones who lay their lives on the line during wartime in defense of the nation. But we are not war, nor are we under any threats of any external invasive aggression from our neighbors in the MRU or elsewhere on the global stage. So how best can we as a nation capitalize on the discipline instilled in members of the RSLAF, besides allowing them to serve as a source of intimidation of voters in polling stations during elections under the auspices of the rogue APC akartas, with their rifles slung over their shoulders so idly and openly.

During akarta time in na we Saro, these folks were used mainly as a reactionary force to subdue any form of resistance to undemocratic practices in contravention to the rule of law that should have served the nation’s democracy favorably.

Times have now changed, and a former military officer is the head- negro- in-charge [HNIC] of the Saro nation presently. So let him put his colleagues to real tangible work for the benefit of ALL of the nationals in the nation. How can this be done?

As stated previously above, the nation is at peace with no forms of internal or external threats of aggression on the horizon. The nation is naturally endowed with all sorts of resources – mineral as well as agricultural. The land is very fertile, and the climatic conditions are temperately ideal, while the seas and rivers are awash with fish and other various kinds of seafood. So why must we be continuously characterized as a pauper state by global standards? Why must a large percentage of the national population live on a dollar a day in hunger? Why is the capital city so unhygienically filthy all of the time? Can we not learn anything from Kigali, Rwanda? Well, the Brigadier has given directives to eliminate these squalid conditions as of yesterday. We should all abide these directives in the infancy of his tenure.

The main thrust of this piece is to encourage the Soja-man dem, ehn Soja-ooman dem na the RSLAF to lead the army of idle unemployed youths in all parts of the nation to mine and extract the diamonds, rutile, iron ore, bauxite, gold, and the other various mineral wealth under the Saro earth in the soil for the prosperity of the nation when these sources are converted into monetary wealth to pay the national bill. If the RUF can exploit our diamonds in waging a savage war of plunder for all those years, why is it not possible for the Saro Sojas to wage an ECONOMIC WAR to resuscitate the national economy so that Prezo Bio can realize his dreams in the SLPP manifesto he won on?

Segments of these Sojas can also lead these youths in developing communal farms consisting of our staple foods such as rice, cassava, potatoes, etc.; and fruits and vegetables in the fertile lands our nation is endowed with. They can plunder the riches of the sea, rivers and lakes, so hunger in the nation is a thing of the past.

I am quite sure most forumites here get the gist of what is being stated by the author of this piece due to the fact he had brought this suggestion up in the past. And this is a continuation of this theme since we have a new Sherriff in town in the embodiment of Prezo Julius Madda Bio.

Let me stop for now until I hear from y’alls on the forum. The debate will continue then.

Kamabai
Reply with quote  #2 
"The main thrust of this piece is to encourage the Soja-man dem, ehn Soja-ooman dem na the RSLAF to lead the army of idle unemployed youths in all parts of the nation to mine and extract the diamonds, rutile, iron ore, bauxite, gold, and the other various mineral wealth under the Saro earth..."  Sengbe


Sengbe,

Interesting piece.  Are you suggesting the replacement of companies with government contracts to mine these minerals with the RSLAF?  If yes, then are you also suggesting that government should be responsible for the physical capital (machines, tools, etc) and technology needed to extract these minerals?
 
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #3 
I am suggesting that the SLPP-led GoSL should allow the organization/formation of indigenous entities in order to be at the forefront in the exploitation of our natural resources, for the benefit of the entire nation with oversight provided by the appropriate arms of the GoSL. The foreign companies that have been privileged to do so are doing so at the disadvantage of the nationals in the nations in return for meager taxes.

Train segments of the RSLAF in the needed practical engineering concepts - be it mechanical, civil, chemical, automotive, agricultural, water resources, etc. - and the use of the appropriate technological know-how to lead in this effort. I am sure there is already an Army Corps of Engineers, per se. In turn, the members of the RSLAF would train the idle unemployed youths na di contri in service to fulfill the function so prescribed. In other words, we must do the woke ourselves with the requisite training to see to it that our natural endowments are fully exploited to our maximum benefit as a modern industrial state.

Where does the money come from for such training and exploitation? The Chinese; our development partners; the World bank; the wealthy Arab nations; the BRIC nations; as a source of valid beneficial  investment for them fully payable when we start making a profit in our stride for industrial development into modernity. We must think out the process and find concrete ways of achieving it. We must think BIG. along these lines. It could be 10 years, even 20 years, before this process becomes successful, but the emptiness in youthful unemployment, and illiteracy would be minimized substantially.
Beresford
Reply with quote  #4 
Government ownership and control of the mines?  Hmmmmmmm.  I cannot conceive of anywhere in the world where this model has worked.  Government should not be in the business of mining minerals as the process of profit maximization will be handicapped by government bureaucracy and inefficiency.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #5 
Should Government not be at the forefront in conceptualizing, and encouraging the way forward for the indigenous private sector to pursue the aims delineated above? Especially when none exists at the moment in a centrally organized fashion?

Should Government not provide the enabling environment to pursue the goals and objectives forwarded above? And have oversight over the participating private sector?

Must we not start somewhere?

Do we now have indigenous companies contractually obligated to mine and extract the natural resources we are endowed with? I am not alluding to the artisanal miners with their pans and shovels digging along the Sewa river.

Bra I am thinking BIG here!

Our goals in this effort can only be achieved through the proper mindset; training; and the acquisition of the needed engineering skills, and technology. And you think the GoSL does NOT have a role to play in this effort?
Salone Baby
Reply with quote  #6 
Mining never made anyone rich. What makes a person/country rich is being able to process/add value to what is mined or grown. The focus must be on developing processing plants for everything we produce and ensuring we have the skills. We must not rely on outside geologists to tell us where to find the minerals. Let outsiders provide the capital but make sure you set rules that ensure they can only leave with processed goods either partly or fully. In that way you create an untold amount of jobs. Everyone must pay taxes. There can be no tax incentives. We are too poor to be giving money away. No government should be looking to own anything. Government-owned company workers are never as productive as private sector workers all around the world. Don't ask my why. That's how the world rolls. And who wants to be responsible for all those salaries and benefits? I like what NASSIT has been doing in recent years. Co-investing in viable projects like the Raddison Blu. We could do with building processing plants using that model. NASSIT has a fair bit of money and must spend it on job-creating investments.
Set rules that a certain proportion of companies' workforce must be Sierra Leonean. Visa for foreign staff should also be used as an income generator and a deterrent to anyone considering hiring outside the country. Again, everyone who works in Sierra Leone must pay their tax in Sierra Leone. So much money that has been lost by all these foreign companies and charities and their workers not paying tax in the country. If a car/house/certain benefits comes with your job, you must pay tax on it. From the president right down to the common man given an okada for his job. Every corner of revenue generation must be looked at and squeezed. Once you are milking every revenue cow, goat, sheep or duck, no soja needs to be mining. His/her life will be comfortable doing what he/she was trained for. Every government staff must be paid a living wage. Kaifala Marah tried to do that. He set a living wage which was too low but a good start nonetheless.
In all this, good money must be spent on education. Let all the development partners put all their money in one basket and spend it all on education. Everyone, young and old must be given the opportunity to learn to read and write and be given an education that can help them get a job or create jobs. Anyone who doesn't want to work cannot then want any form of handouts from government. Then bring in foreign investors for healthcare. People who are earning decent wages can afford healthcare.
Beresford
Reply with quote  #7 
"Should Government not provide the enabling environment to pursue the goals and objectives forwarded above? And have oversight over the participating private sector?"  Sengbe



Sengbe,

I have no problem with the government providing an enabling environment for domestic or/and foreign direct investment.  In fact that must be the task of government.  There must be an effective partnership with the private sector in the pursuit of economic growth.
But your initial argument that RSLAF should be employed in the mining of minerals has the connotation that government should now be directly involved in the extraction and management of mining in Sierra Leone.  This is the argument that I have a problem.  Government replacing the private sector does a poor job at maximizing profits and laying the groundwork for growth.  Government jobs do not create wealth.  Government institutions are too bureaucratic for the pursuit of wealth creation.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #8 
"...But your initial argument that RSLAF should be employed in the mining of minerals has the connotation that government should now be directly involved in the extraction and management of mining in Sierra Leone..." Beresford

The suggestion in the proposal inferred that since we do not now have the wherewithal indigenously to mine, and extract the minerals our nation is endowed with abundantly on an industrial scale; and since we have a very large body of unemployed folks roaming around in droves, we must endeavor to eliminate those shortcomings by training, and providing the tools to the Sojas of the RSLAF, a disciplined force, to lead segments of unemployed/illiterate folks to become employable in the mining and other sectors. The logistics of how this can be facilitated can be worked out by the GoSL through consultation with technocrats having expertise in this domain. It must be initiated by the governors of the land centrally, is the point I was trying to make.

This proposal emanates from my professional experience working for NASA and other government agencies in the USA, known as technology-transfer: technology developed at these agencies does not rest on its laurels in the initiating agencies; it is transferred to the private sector for the benefit of the nationals in the nation. How do you think Elon Musk has the ability to fly payloads into space? It is through the technology transferred from the NASA Space Shuttle program to the private sector. He and others are now capitalizing on that transfer. They could not have done so without the initial input and investment of the US Government. In like manner, the GoSL can initially invest in the training of the manpower and purchase of needed tools for the industrial mining, per se, to bear fruits, which can then be transferred absolutely to the private sector experts, thereby killing two or three birds with only one stone.

"...This is the argument that I have a problem..."

This is a brain-storming session; we clarify as the session ensues

"...Government replacing the private sector does a poor job at maximizing profits and laying the groundwork for growth..."

Wrong! Government initiates, and the private sector takes over. 

"...Government jobs do not create wealth..."

No! But she provides the incentives for wealth-creation.

"...Government institutions are too bureaucratic for the pursuit of wealth creation..."

Probably so, in providing the needed oversight.

Sengbe
Reply with quote  #9 
@ Saro Baby:

Where have you been?

That was quite a mouthful in your written piece, as a respondent.

Ee don tay we u day tink bot this ehn? Sengbe bring out of you na di Bintu, eh? Well u do well!

I agree with most of what you have stated in a progressive mode, but norto all ting.

U try oh!

Ar for consider u as running mate in the future, but u na APC? [lol]
Salone Baby
Reply with quote  #10 
Sengbe
Why is it that anyone who disagrees with Maada must be an APC supporter? I won't want to be anyone's running mate. I believe if I was to get into politics and even run for president I can win on my own record. I reckon even within SLPP I will beat you for the flagbearership if we stood against each other. Yes. I am that confident.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #11 
This is the main reason for the title of this piece as stated in the Economist"

"...A little hope in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone’s new president has made big promises

But he may not have the money to keep them..."

So what is the most expedient way to get the money Maada Bio needs to keep his promises to the peoples of Saro?

Sengbe still maintains that the "idle" Sojas must lead us in doing the woke ourselves, indigenously.

Sengbe
Reply with quote  #12 
@ Saro Baby:
Please take note of the question mark at the end of the query:

"Ar for consider u as running mate in the future, but u na APC?  [lol]

"...I reckon even within SLPP I will beat you for the flagbearership if we stood against each other. Yes. I am that confident..." SB (Sylvia Blyden??)

Perhaps!

Well, that is the spirit: over-confidence.

Me norto politrickcian lek unu.

Ormoss experience u geh if u norto the parenthetical SB mentioned above? 
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