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Sengbe
Reply with quote  #1 
I am quite sure most on this forum have had some okro soup either with foofoo or rice. But did you all know about the nutritional contents in okra? Well, I went online and researched the nutritional composition of okra, and I am happy to report the results to the participants on this forum and interested parties in peeperland, who may not have the time to conduct this research. So here goes:

Raw okra is 90% water, 2% protein, 7% carbohydrate, and the fat content is negligible. In a sample, raw okra is rich in dietary fiber, vitamin C, and vitamin K, and moderate amounts of thymine, folate and magnesium. A more extensive listing of the nutritional value per a 3oz serving of okra ensues:

The fuel value = 138 kJ. The carbohydrate content (7.45 g) consisting of sugars and dietary fiber = 1.48g and 3.2g, respectively. Fat = 0.19g . Protein = 1.9g.

The vitamin content is extensive. Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B9, C, E, K, are present in raw and cooked okra.

The mineral content is also elaborate: Ca, Mg, P, K, and Zn.

Thus, Okra can be considered to be a medicinal vegetable, and one of the best natural vegetables on Earth. Furthermore, since it's fiber content is very high, this helps in the process of digestion, and the regularization of bowel movement due to the soluble Pectin, which swells up in the intestine and helps in the easier elimination of wastes in the intestine.

So unu nor forgeh for eat unu okro soup oh!
Eddie Grant
Reply with quote  #2 
Kothor Semgbe,
You have just put to rest a long time disagreement. In which case, my wife has become triumphant.
Long time ago, I used to complain of constipation and my woman will cook okro. One day, I asked why do you normally cook Okro whenever I'm constipated? Her answer was, so you can have a loose stomach. But I never belived her.
Today, you've proved her right and she asked me to convey her gratitude. So you have a supporter here. Lol
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #3 
Well, that is the beauty in having an education. Your wife probably learned this salient fact from her own Mom, who, in turn, understood the intricacies of the nutritional values of the natural foods we are accustomed to in our native land from her own parents, and on, and on.

We are tasked, as educated folks, to investigate, and record the nutritional composition of the foods in our collective natural diets for the sake of posterity. This is the reason I have embarked on this project, and submit the results in layman's terms on the Bintu. So please indulge me, folks, in the name of Marcus Garvey.

Well, "Smallboy" Eddie, do you normally get a free/loose bowel movement after your Wife feeds you with Okoro soup/sauce? More power to her.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #4 
Nutrition Facts Pertinent to Palm Oil
Serving Size100 g
 
Amount Per Serving
 
Calories 884
 
% Daily Value
 
Total Fat 100g154 %
 
   Saturated Fat 49g245 %
 
Total Carbohydrate 0g0 %
 
   Dietary Fiber 0g0 %
 
   Sugar 0g 
 
Protein 0g0 %
 
Vitamin A0 % Vitamin C0 %
 
Calcium0 %Iron0 %
 
Daily values are based on 2000 calorie diet.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #5 
Most of the vegetable sauces we like to eat is cooked in red palm oil. Well, palm oil contains mainly saturated fat, but no trans fat, and no protein, no carbohydrate, no vitamins, and no minerals.

The fuel value for fat is nominally 37 kJ/mole, which is higher than either protein and carbohydrate, each with a fuel value of 17 kJ/mole, respectively.

Based on these values, we must continue to consume this source of fat, but very moderately.
DMK
Reply with quote  #6 
Nice thread @Sengbe.

Palm oil is certainly interesting. It other uses as well other than food but as a food it does give a certain flavour which you can't get from anything else. All in moderation though as you say as the saturated fat content is so high.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #7 
Hello, cousin DMK.

I am heartened that you have decided to participate in this thread. As you very well know the educational sector in SL is in shambles, so we must contribute to the improvement of this sector from afar. We have been blessed and given the opportunity to gain a first-class education in our various fields of endeavor, we are in the diaspora, we must try to give back in whatever way we can to improve the lives of our folks back home, and this is one way of doing so - sharing the knowledge we have acquired over the years.

God bless you, and season's greetings to you and yours.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #8 
"...It[has] other uses as well other than food..." DMK

Indeed, palm oil is used for other purposes beside nutrition, like making soap and other toiletries, through the process called saponification, wherein an ester is allowed to react with a saturated fat (like palm oil) yielding these products.

I left this aspect out because I was only concentrating on the nutritional function of palm oil in the thread.
Eddie Grant
Reply with quote  #9 
, "Smallboy" Eddie, do you normally get a free/loose bowel movement after your Wife feeds you with Okoro soup/sauce? Kothor Semgbe.

I wonder if the above title still befitting to a man of 42.
Anyway, I did appreciate my wife's effort to ensure my comfort.

Jeppeh Man
Reply with quote  #10 
Sengbe you can create a thread captioned SENGBE'S CORNER for publishing your research findings. It will be like a knowledge bank or resource center. It should lend itself to referencing by those who seek particular pieces of information.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #11 
Okro soup with foo-foo is a dish I had about two months ago at a restaurant in MD. I think it’s the first time I ever had it. It was delicious.

I never knew about the benefits of okro. I rarely eat it but will have it more often in the future.

Thanks for the information Prof.
Bra Enviable
Reply with quote  #12 
"We have been blessed and given the opportunity to gain a first-class education in our various fields of endeavor, we are in the diaspora, we must try to give back in whatever way we can to improve the lives of our folks back home, and this is one way of doing so - sharing the knowledge we have acquired over the years."         By Kaamor Sengbe


You are right, Kaamor.  The classroom is not the only place for spreading literacy or enlightenment. While the classroom remains incontestably suitable for the dispensation of knowledge, technological advances have made it possible for education, or forms of education, to be dispensed outside the classroom.  Moved by the poor writing skills of students, politicians and even so-called academics in Sierra Leone, I chose to frequently discuss English grammar on my Facebook page. The lessons are entitled, "Each One, Teach One," a well-known expression among black people, after the abolition of slavery.

FBC students, teachers and kinsmen from Kailahun and Kenema,  find my Facebook discussions quite useful. A lot of academic absurdities and grammatical issues have been discussed and sorted out, on my Facebook page. The possession of a college degree does NOT necessarily mean the possessor is actually educated. There are many  semi-illiterates in possession of college degrees. Facebook and other social fora have exposed that fact.  From the Diaspora to Sierra Leone, the men and women on my Facebook page clearly appreciate the lessons in English grammar and other sociopolitical issues.  Keep it up,  Kaamor Sengbe


Bra Enviable 

Sengbe
Reply with quote  #13 
@ Eddie Grant:

"...I wonder if the above title still befitting to a man of 42..." EG

I do not understand the quoted statement above. What do you mean? BTW you are making me believe that I have been spelling my known moniker in the wrong way, with the inserted "m" as opposed to "n". Anyway bad nor day.

@ Jeppeh Man [Are you sure you did not steal that moniker from our erstwhile JEppeh Londo ( Specky)?]

"...Sengbe you can create a thread captioned SENGBE'S CORNER for publishing your research findings..."

Good idea! But I am more used to the Bintu, where many folks participate or peep. I do not want to be "elitist" in relaying information that ought to benefit my Saro pipul.

@ Specky
You are quite welcome. When was the last time you ate some saki tomboy?
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #14 
Ah! Bra E is back. I am happy that you have returned to participate in this thread.

Bra na true u torke so gbain! So leh we continue for extend our profession on social media, because once a "teacher" ALWAYS a "teacher".

Please continue to extend you vast knowledge everywhere you find yourself.

Kehtamia!
Eddie Grant
Reply with quote  #15 
Well Kothor Semgbe/Sengbe,
I'm referring to the word Smallboy in quotation. I'm not opposing you calling me Smallboy, afterwards you're much more senior than I am with great respect. I'm only asking if Smallboy still befit a man who have attained 42 years. Lol

Please don't mind my spelling of your moniker. I spelt it that way once, and with this digital age of smart phones, the word automatically appears the moment I write Kothor. I'll try to change it so that my device can recognise the preferred spelling.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #16 
Prof Sengbe,

It’s been a few months since I last had some saki tomboy. Love that dish.

Bra Enviable
Reply with quote  #17 
Sengbe: Baika. Kaamor yeakpe Mia Ar Biyea. Ngewor E Bi Lubah.



Bra Enviable
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #18 
@ Eddie Grant

"...I'm referring to the word Smallboy in quotation..." EG

Eddie, I was in a Bo School frame of mind, when I referred to you as "Smallboy". You see, if you attend Bo School, Senior boys are referred to as "Korthors" and junior boys are referred to as "smallboys".  This is the reason I refer to Fen P! as "smallboy", and he takes no offence based on this knowledge.

You, on the other hand, I suspect that you were in a cultural Temene frame of mind using the adjective "Korthor" to mean "colleague". Do you agree?

In that case we are on the same wavelength now.

I will retain the original spelling of my moniker.

@ Bra E: Bia beh, baika.

@ Specky
Bra na for learn for cook saki tomboy. I was pleasantly surprised to learn that you can still speak and write in Mende. Do any of your siblings speak Mende like you?

Be blessed!
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #19 
I have forgotten most of the Mende I used to understand as a child and now get help when I post here. What I painstakingly take time to write is corrected by a relative.

My father’s elder sister was one of the first people to teach Mende in a Salone secondary school. She and my father were experts in Mende grammar, structure, etc.; something the church found useful when they needed translators. All her kids were very fluent in Mende.

When we returned from the UK in the 1960s my old man hired a relative to teach us but he was unsuccessful. Later on when I was a young adult I I hired the same guy but he didn’t do much better.
Jeppeh Man
Reply with quote  #20 
Sengbe I used the word "thread" rather than "web page" or "blog spot". You can create the thread in bintuland just as you have done in other cases. For it not to be lost you can request the admin to pin it as in the case of the elections polls.
DMK
Reply with quote  #21 
Well I had Foo foo and Okra soup last night for dinner. My wife is of the opinion it keeps you warmer on the inside for longer during these cold winter days and who am I to argue?

So question Prof, what is the calorific value of foo-foo and is it a slow releasing starch perhaps?
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #22 
In addition to Okro/Okra soup, what other types of soups/sauces go with foo-foo? Dem wan dem wae dae draw mostly. Forgotten their names. Need to know so I’ll have an idea what to order if I decide to have foo-foo again.

Some questions follow

I often wonder about the origins of these dishes. Did Salone folks eat foo-foo, okra, cassada lif 500 years ago? Apart from Salone folks, who else makes that Salone type foo-foo. Who invented foo-foo?
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #23 
"...So question Prof, what is the calorific value of foo-foo and is it a slow releasing starch perhaps?..." DMK
 I don't know exactly. But since the fuel value of a starchy carbohydrate, like foofoo, is 17 kJ/g or 4 Cal/g, it must not be too high.

The fuel value is the energy released when one gram (g) of any substance is combusted. I know that you know that we get all of our energy for our bodily functions through combustion reactions.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #24 
"...In addition to Okro/Okra soup, what other types of soups/sauces go with foo-foo?..." Specky

Biso, shorkortoryokortor, eat-broke-plate, egusi, krain-krain, to name a few more.

"...Did Salone folks eat foo-foo, okra, cassada lif 500 years ago?..."

I am quite sure they did since they lived during that time span in history.

"...Apart from Salone folks, who else makes that Salone type foo-foo..."

The Igbos and Yorubas of Nigeria.

"...Who invented foo-foo?..."

GOD.
For Specky
Reply with quote  #25 
To answer your question, the Temnes of Salone invented foo-foo. According to sources the idea came up after the arrival of the Krios who knew so little about cassava that they never considered it as a serious food alternative. The first trial took place at Newton village on the orders of King Jimmy. After the creation of the first foo-foo sample (which included a sauce made from the following condiments: sawa-sawa leaves, some bush meat, fish and egusi), it was taken to the King who in turn invited his new Krio friends for testing. The outcome of the testing led the Krios to include foo-foo in their menu since they had difficulty adapting to our kind of rice at that time.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #26 
“Biso, shorkortoryokortor, eat-broke-plate, egusi, krain-krain, ...” Foo Sauces/soups courtesy Prof Sengbe

Prof Sengbe I only recognize two sauces amongst those named; egusi and krain-krain....I must try the others.

Igbo are known for egba (garri) and Yoruba pounded yam and amala. Not once have I eaten Salone style foo-foo at a Nigerian home or restaurant in Nigeria or the diaspora. Amala and pounded yam are delicious with the right soup/sauce.

I once tried foo-foo and granat soup. Think it was prepared by some Liberians. After some hesitation and equivocation, I dug in and was pleasantly suprised at how tasty it was.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #27 
@For Specky: U go sign for dat?

For Specky
Reply with quote  #28 
Why not Specky? Most of the information I got from Krios along the Peninsula as well as along the Waterloo-Newton area and mountain villages. From the same sources also I learned that the Mendes invented cassava-made garri as a sustainable alternative to the yam-made garri from Lagos, Nigeria after being inspired by the Temnes' foo-foo invention.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #29 
@For Specky, thanks for the information
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #30 
"...Sengbe I used the word "thread" rather than "web page" or "blog spot". You can create the thread in bintuland just as you have done in other cases. For it not to be lost you can request the admin to pin it as in the case of the elections polls..." Jeppeh Man

Would you kindly help to set it up, since it seems that you know so much about these sorts of things?

All you would have to do, I suspect, is to collate the contents of my research on the Bintu into a "blog spot". I have never done this before, hence the need for your assistance in this endeavor. I mean, you are the one that suggested it in the first place, did you not? So help me. I will supply the information on the Bintu, as usual, and you will collate and coalesce it in the "web page" you are referring to.

Are you game enough, Jeppeh Man?
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