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Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #61 
Compared to Ghanaian and Nigerian schools in Accra (Achimota) Kumasi, Lagos (Gregs, Kings College) Ibadan, and the east, our schools lagged way way way behind. No?

Ar nor memba boku privilege posin me yone tem. Boku man bin dae nak ten toe di tem wae me go skool. If dem tiff man ihm plastic sandals or craipe nar ten toe u nak so.

Kolleh
Reply with quote  #62 
"Compared to Ghanaian and Nigerian schools in Accra (Achimota) Kumasi, Lagos (Gregs, Kings College) Ibadan, and the east, our schools lagged way way way behind. No?"  Spectator 007

Spectator,

How did our schools lag behind Nigerian and Ghanaian Schools? 
Contextual Value
Reply with quote  #63 
"What do you refer to as a privileged background in Sierra Leone?  

You mean a country of mass poverty, with one of the highest rates of unemployment in the world can all of a sudden produce an entrenched privileged class whose children are capable of filling the ranks of Prince of Wales, St. Edwards, Grammar School, CKC, Bo School, Albert Academy, Annie Walsh and St. Joseph's Convent?"

I shy away from using unsavoury words such as ignorant, so i will remain unruffled with my riposte, reply or response.

There is no middle class in Sierra Leone because it is dirt poor. I am pretty sure we are both agreed on that. That reinforces my viewpoint that the divide between the privileged few and the majority poor is really massive. Those privileged few either by virtue of their wealth, social standing, connections or ol' boyism have easier access to these few good schools.

In case i forget, have you ever heard of selection by house prices? It is no coincidence that some of the so-called tier 1 schools dotted along this thread are not located in the East End of Freetown. 
Guy Banga
Reply with quote  #64 
Contextual Value,

Man, give up this bogus bourgeois argument.  When did you attend secondary school?  In the 1930s?  Did you read what Spectator 007 wrote?  I attended Bo School and Prince of Wales and can attest to the fact that majority of the students in both schools during my time came from poor backgrounds.  Where is this bogus privilege that you are trumpeting?
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #65 
@Kolleh: Those Ghanaian and Nigerian schools had more resources ...both material and human...and if I may add, better quality. They did much better than our schools in WAEC exams and still do. Sierra Leoneans who could afford it and were aware of this, used to send their kids to these schools.

Back in the day, I knew guys who were struggling back home who went to school in these countries and did extremely well in O and A level exams. Where the whole of Salone would produce less than 10 people with two distinctions to qualify for a national scholarship; a single top school on Ghana would produce 30 students who would attain two or more distinctions at A levels.
Contextual Value
Reply with quote  #66 
"I attended Bo School and Prince of Wales and can attest to the fact that majority of the students in both schools during my time came from poor backgrounds.  Where is this bogus privilege that you are trumpeting."

That's not the case. The parents of most of Bo School new students are former students of the school.

Prince of wales is dominated by Krios and those who live around Kingtom. Of course  few places were reserved for outsiders with high academic potential.

The above i know for a fact.
Contextual Value
Reply with quote  #67 
Another sad story about the educational divide

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-39179574

Young and pregnant in Sierra Leone

Hawa studies hairdressingImage copyrightOLIVIA ACLAND

Pregnant girls in Sierra Leone are prevented from attending school, as they are thought to be a bad influence on their peers.

In April 2015 - just as schools re-opened after the Ebola crisis - the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology issued a statement banning pregnant girls from mainstream education and from sitting exams.

Kolleh
Reply with quote  #68 
Spectator 007,

Interesting analysis.  I have heard this narrative before that Nigerian and Ghanaian students ace high school public exams in their respective countries.  But that should not be a conclusive evidence that these two countries have a superior high school education relative to Salone.  
My argument is premised on my experience attending two universities in Europe with a high number of Nigerian and Ghanaian students.  My impression was that while a few were above average, the majority were either average or below average students.  In fact many actually struggled with the spoken English Language.
 I would not trade my Grammar School education for any Nigerian or Ghanaian secondary school education.
Guy Banga
Reply with quote  #69 
Contextual Value,

We may have to shake hands or even toast a cyber beer to this debate and let it go.   There is no way you are going to convince with your noveau riche and bourgeois conception of Sierra Leonean secondary school education.  Not only did I attend Bo School and Prince of Wales but I also taught at Albert Academy.  So I know what I am talking about.
Akabi Davies
Reply with quote  #70 
Contextual Value should be left to wallow in his world of ignorance and unmitigable arrogance. His world is devoid of the real reality. Trying to forcefully apply social stratification to Salone schools exposes CV as a man who either attended Salone schools during the 'tangays' era or whose knowledge of the Sierra Leonean society ranges from mediocre to zero.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #71 
@Kolleh: The Ghanian and Nugerian students were it born smarter than Sierra Leoneans but they had better secondary schools than we did. Sierra Leonaans who joined them typically held their own. Dem Ghana man enh Nigerian bin dae cram bad bad wan ...dae recite sentence enh paragraph!

I am convinced that if our high schools have similar resources, we would do just as well in WAEC exams...just as we hold our own with them when we attend the same schools (leveling the playing field) in the diaspora
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #72 
In secondary school, kids who I considered privilaged, were typically Lebanese or from Kono.

Back in the day owing pants made from "French Tergal" meant you were someone who to be reckoned with. You were the real deal. Where those dudes would have 10 or more Tergal pants, "False-life" pretenders would be lucky to have a single pair. My elder brother had a pair that made both of us feel proud. When it was stolen we were very depressed.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #73 
Let's stop deluding ourselves. Our folks back home are very poor. There has never been a time when we had a significant middle class. What we should be concerned with, is how we can assist them.

Most of us can easily sponsor the education of several deserving kids through high school. We can do that directly or through our various alumni associations.
Guy Banga
Reply with quote  #74 
Spectator,

Many of the Kono students were not even privileged, not even those that came from houses of chiefs.  The Lebanese?  Yes.  But I did not notice any deep social stratification induced by income inequality among Sierra Leoneans during my secondary school days.  Contextual Value is a dreamer.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #75 
Guy Banga,

I should have qualified my piece a bit more.

This was at the school I attended as a boarder. AA.

The Kono guys in the boarding school were loaded and had serious sponsors.

Ar know wetin ar bin see wit me yone yeye.

If u bin see dem chok box. All kinaba ting insye dae. Enh dem bin loaded.

Dreg man dem bin dae fet for make dem padi..for pilot dem.
Contextual Value
Reply with quote  #76 


Contextual Value,

We may have to shake hands or even toast a cyber beer to this debate and let it go.   There is no way you are going to convince with your noveau riche and bourgeois conception of Sierra Leonean secondary school education.  Not only did I attend Bo School and Prince of Wales but I also taught at Albert Academy.  So I know what I am talking about.

Guy Banga,


take that statement to students of Richard Allen, Bishop Johnson, Kankaylay and Ansarul located in the most deprived areas of Freetown. Government funding for these schools including teacher salaries should be twice as much as what your Bo School and Prince of Wales receive. High performing Students from these schools should be offered places into higher institutions of Sierra Leone even if they have two grades lower than the entry eligibility.

I am their advocate not because i am an alumnus of any of them schools but because i strongly believe in social mobility. I went to a top school, top of the pile in my year group and of course i am from an ordinary working family that was only getting by. 

Now read this to see what progressives exercise their minds on:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-39107310

Let us agree to disagree to declutter this thread and discourage you from further indulging yourself in glee in using the word "ignorant".
Principal Sandy
Reply with quote  #77 
Where those dudes would have 10 or more Tergal pants, "False-life" pretenders would be lucky to have a single pair. My elder brother had a pair that made both of us feel proud. When it was stolen we were very depressed.-Specky

Lol. Specky you have made my day with this hillarious statement of yours. You sound like a sufferer who used to grab the least opportunity to bartoline a friend who was well-off either to survive economically or improve his social standing. At least you are modest and humble in comparison with CV who has been indulging in burlesquing his capabilities and those of his alma mater. I can identify with you more than CV.
Guy Banga
Reply with quote  #78 
"The Kono guys in the boarding school were loaded and had serious sponsors."  Spectator 007

Spectator 007,

You are debating with a Kono man and your statement above is misleading.  If anything, it purports that Kono students were wealthy with a chain of support that bred an infinite amount of cash.  Nothing can be further from the truth.

In Kono, the cliche that it takes a village to raise a child has more basis in reality than in places like Freetown.    Before the Kono student leaves for boarding school in places like Bo and Freetown, the extended family comes around and chips in to ensure that the student does not struggle for anything while on campus.  My father was a postal worker with barely enough to sustain the family.  But I never struggled during my school days because the aunts, the uncles and the grandparents were all around to help.  Is this what CV is referring to as a privileged background?                    
Principal Sandy
Reply with quote  #79 
Based on his claims I am beginning to sense that Contextual Value is one of those Krio boys who had a misleading and stratified construct of the Sierra Leonean society. He views Salone schools through the lenses of Creoledom which is absolutely unrealistic. His attempt to make us subscribe to his claims of  schools classifications based on social classes is unprecedented and preposterous.
DMK
Reply with quote  #80 
If I may add my own 2 cents worth, I think both sides in this debate are partly right (6 blind men of Hindustan?). From what I remember, the sons and daughters of the elite did indeed congregate in these so called top schools but at the same time, there were many students from average, even poor backgrounds as well.

I entered AA from an average family and there were plenty there like me and many who were from even more challenged backgrounds. We outnumbered the elites. OK by the time I left the old man was in a job which I guess pushed us into the so called elite but my point remains. These schools had students from every background mixed in together.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #81 
Guy Banga,

You have a very good point. However, let me hasten to add, that these Kono guys I was in boarding school did not for the most part fit the category you described, which was typical of a high school Kono student. Most in my boarding school came from prominent families or were well connected. Among them were sons of powerful paramount Chiefs, professionals, big time politicians, diamond dealers etc Nar bin bomba dem pikin. We bin dae hole dem bomb.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #82 
@Honorable DMK: So you are a fellow
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #83 
@DMK: Meant to write that we are fellow alumni.

I could sense that you attended the greatest school in the country.

More power to you.
Principal Sandy
Reply with quote  #84 
I could sense that you attended the greatest school in the country.- Specky

This is the problem I am having with some of you guys from these so-called top schools. Why is AA having such glorious tag? Who sanctioned it? And by whose standards?
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #85 
@Principal Sandy: Why are you complaining about something that is even stated in the constitution under the clause dealing with education?...namely, that it is the greatest school and all others must strive to attain their great standards.
:-)
Theorist
Reply with quote  #86 
Chai! So now that we are almost done debating about the best school's and their products,  the question is, "where is the beef"? 
Theorist
Reply with quote  #87 
Schools please! 
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #88 
@Principal Sandy: Lighten up my friend... I'm just having fun. No harm meant.
Guy Banga
Reply with quote  #89 
"Among them were sons of powerful paramount Chiefs, professionals, big time politicians, diamond dealers etc" Spectator 007.


Spectator,

The category of students that I described in my earlier analysis still holds even in the case of children of paramount chiefs and politicians.  I can argue that relative to the rest of the country, Kono has always had a minute number of indigences in national politics. Additionally, the few Konos that were in national politics at the time I was in school were not all that powerful.

Now, the Mende boys that attended Bo School with me fell more into the category that you described than Konos.  Bo School had more children of paramount chiefs than any other School in Salone.  And Bo School also had a big share of the children of powerful politicians.  Same held for our cross-town rivals, CKC, where the children of Sir Albert Margai and other powerful Mende politicians and chiefs were schooled.

Fact is, the entrenched extended family system in Kono gave a false impression of the social status of many Kono students.  These guys were not loaded.  And even the paramount chiefs in Kono were not loaded.  But there was always the extended family system to fill in any vacuum in the income generation process.

Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #90 
Guy Banga of Bo School Fame,

I must thank you for your very thought provoking and indeed educative posts. They have forced me to put my thinking cap on and in a reflective state of mind.

Clearly while our experiences are not exactly the same, there is much overlap.

No doubt, Bo school catered more to the sons of the politically connected and traditional rulers than AA. At AA, boarding home, we also had children of the politically connected but clearly not as many sons of traditional rulers as your school.

While I was in the boarding school many Moyamba based Sherbro traditional rulers sent their children to AA. Did you come across many when you were at Bo School?

I assume these Sherbro Chiefs sent their kids to AA because they were church members. A good number of the boarders were also children of southern EUB (later UMC) pastors or administrators on church scholarships. Konos were about 10% of boarders; say 10-15 students so they may not have been typical for schools in the rest of the country. This was at a time when SLST was in Kono and the "kafa" (money) was flowing. Do you recall those days?





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