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Sengbe
Reply with quote  #1 

PREAMBLE

Please allow me to continue my brainstorming sessions on the Bintu in my desire to enable civilized mature folks to participate very effectively in the solution of problems faced by our compatriots in the motherland.

The main objective of these sessions, in my humble opinion, is to allow us to participate in solving problems from afar while residing in the diaspora due to the professional , and general opportunities, offered to us in the parts of the diaspora of our residence that are precluded in the motherland through no fault of ours.

Recently, I have delved into how illiteracy can be minimized through the establishment of ICT centers; specifically, for the purpose of adult education as a priority, due to the high rate of illiteracy in the general population with education in effective language communication skills in the two languages we use as the lingua franca in the country: the English language, and the Krio language, as the primary focal points at first, assuming that there is a need for that type of adult education for those who cannot communicate effectively in either of those two languages. Every person in that population speaks, and can communicate effectively in his or her native tongue, but to do so amongst all the members of the national population, we must endeavor to train the non-speakers in the two languages we use to communicate with each other universally. I, myself, communicate effectively in four languages, so I can hold my own in this regard wherever I might go in Saro. I would like my compatriots to be offered this same opportunity; hence that is the main desire in that thread.

Next, I offered my opinions about the establishment of a sustainable governance structure due to the fact that the governance structure we had adhered to for the past 56 years has allowed the cankerworms in our “democracy” to grow in an exponential manner with no end in sight, thereby nullifying the germination of good governance to our national disadvantage relative to the independence of the institutions in the three arms of governance in a pluralistic democratic structure as practiced oberyanda.

For the love of my motherland, I initiated a thread to wish her happy birthday. No one responded in kind. So what kind of patriotism is shown by Saro folks on the Bintu in that regard? Not to worry though! Next, I endeavored to bring the plight of the SLP to light, but I was misunderstood by some literately-illiterate folks on the ground; I was insulted, but  I vigorously retaliated in kind, and they backed off.

During the next stage of my brainstorming sessions on the Bintu, I made it known to one and all that I do not, and will not appreciated the actions of the Islamic barbarians who give the Islamic faith a bad name through their very barbaric actions toward my peoples of sub-Saharan descent, and their involvement in enslaving those folks I have mentioned.

The foregoing encapsulates quite accurately my activity relative to the brainstorming sessions I have initiated in April and May of 2017 so far. I am now in the process of initiating a brainstorming session relative to how the nation should create the needed wealth to accommodate all of our developmental strides into modernity, independently for the most part, because no nation in the world body is an island, proverbially-speaking. It is entitled as follows: “WE MUST DO THE WOKE” ourselves. So here it goes:

Sengbe
Reply with quote  #2 

Our tendency to rely on foreigners to come in and generate wealth for themselves, and their own nations to the disadvantage of Saronians must be eliminated totally. We must be allowed, and enabled to do the exploration and exploitation of our God-given endowments as a fundamental priority in creating wealth for our nation to fully develop into modernity, presently and/or into the future sustainably, and everlastingly  must be a primary goal for any administration in the governance of the nation. We must eliminate the excuses we have been using to preclude our participation in national wealth-creation, including our very bad habits in corruptive governance, and the very bad attitudes we portray toward each other in assimilation due to our tribal differences. I have written theoretically about how this issue can be solved in an amicable way on the Bintu in the past. But did anyone really “listen”? I dunno! Perhaps someone did. But whom!  Again, not to worry!

So! How are we going to do the woke in order to obviate our description in the world as one of the poorest nations in the world, where the daily subsistence level is less than $2 per day for the average Joe/Jill?

Well we must get the military folks involved in spearheading the efforts. How? Well, they are disciplined in being well-trained, assumingly, so they can lead a national effort, in extracting the minerals we are naturally endowed with; refining them, and adding value to them, while the economists, business folks in management, etc., can get involved in capitalizing on their beneficial exploitation/capitalization on behalf of the nation as a whole. In short, they would lead the unemployed able-bodied men, and women in the needed fields in income-generation for the national benefit while providing beneficially / gainfully for their own immediate and extended families, as the case may be. Let me elaborate on this theme for a moment, by using member s of the RSLAF (Republic of Sierra Leone Armed Forces) as an illustration:

There are how many members in this force? Ten thousand! Are they very well-trained and disciplined? I think so. How many battalions, or brigades, are involved in this composition? 10? At 1000 sojas in a battalion? The math says so. How many barracks are they housed into, and where are they located? Well, there is one at Wilberforce, Goderich, Benguema, in the Western Area; one at Tekko in Makeni, Bombali district, in the Northern province; one at Daru, my maternal homeland, in Kenema District, in the Eastern Province. So, from a logistical perspective these men and women are distributed evenly throughout the nation. We must try to educate and train these disciplined men and women as engineers, managers, etc. in fields such as mining engineering, agricultural engineering, civil engineering, water-resources engineering / marine engineering, road construction engineering, forestry, etc., etc. On qualification in each of these disciplines / fields, they can, in turn, train the unemployed/ interested folks who are able-bodied, to build national farms, roads, miners of gold, diamonds, rutile, iron-ore, uranium, etc., etc. It would be left with the business-minded nationals; the bankers, the economists, etc., to transform these natural products into the wealth needed to sustain the national growth ad infinitum, forever and ever, Amen? After all they are NOT
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #3 

participating in any war time activities in the land, save for some peacekeeping duties somewhere in Africa, per se, for which we can spare about 800 of them sojas. Don’t you think? I do. In their absence from their primary function as the defenders of the nation, the SLP will be there to control law and order, as they should be doing objectively, anyway. Plus we seem to have very friendly neighbors in the MRU, West Africa, and Africa as a whole, so no one is going to declare war on us again in the foreseeable future, I presume, as Foday Laimpay is dead and gone to Hades. Who is gonna declare war on us? AFK, the APC Limba boy?  As he intimated recently in another thread!  Woe betide him to even think or try that bullsh-t.

To summarize: I am advocating for the military folks in the RSLAF to spearhead the effort in extracting, refining, general capitalization in the exploitation of the natural resources of Saro for the benefit of ALL of the Saro peoples and their nation, so that they can live happily after in a very modern state.

In the next part of this brainstorming session, I will attempt to delve into how the korppor so generated should be spent appropriately.

N.B.

Please, if you have nothing tangible to contribute but rudeness and vulgarity to/in this thread, STAY AWAY! Or you’d be vigorously repulsed in kind manner. Be warned!!

LordaMercy
Reply with quote  #4 
Wow!!! What role does inward foreign direct investment (IFDI) have in this model?
This analysis reads very much like a proposal for a closed economy.  

I think certain aspects of human endeavor should be left to the economists and political scientists.

Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #5 
Politics is an industry for guys on the ground. Diasporans who return have minimal impact to the best of my knowledge. So while we discus issues impacting the lives of our compatriots on the ground and search for solutions, we do have to be realistic about the influence we in the diaspora have back home.

By the way, have any of the political parties entertained the idea of allowing those of us on the diaspora to vote? I doubt it but yet they want to raise funds in the diaspora for election campaigns.

Let the discussions continue.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #6 
Typing fast on smart phone so please ignore errors like " on the diaspora"
Fullah Town
Reply with quote  #7 
"By the way, have any of the political parties entertained the idea of allowing those of us on the diaspora to vote?"  Spectator 007

Specky,

How about folks in the Diaspora requesting voting rights?
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #8 
@Fullah Town: Good point.

I watched clips from a video the other day where Abdulai Batraytay spokesman for the Salone government discussed the issue with compatriots at some meeting recently held on NJ. If I find the video, I'll post it here.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #9 
Let me first correct the fact that Daru , my maternal hometown, is in KAILAHUN district, and NOT Kenema district as I erroneously stated yesterday.

Now to Specky's assertion:

"...So while we discus issues impacting the lives of our compatriots on the ground and search for solutions, we do have to be realistic about the influence we in the diaspora have back home..." Spectator 007

I am / we are NOT trying to "influence" anyone back home, all I am / we are trying to do is generate brainstorming sessions about the way forward in the development of a "poor" nation like Sierra Leone in the eyes of the global community based on our valued experiences we have acquired working and living in the diaspora. We are suggesting ways that could help bring in improvements which will usher in improvements in the living conditions of our fellow country men and women especially since developmental growth is either at a standstill for the age of an independent nation, or it is occurring at very slow rate. Thus, influencing folks on the ground is not the primary motivation as you seem to believe.

You state, and I quote:
"...Diasporans who return have minimal impact to the best of my knowledge..."

We all know about this stated fact of yours, but must we relent in offering opinions about the way forward if our views are publicly expressed in a medium such as this one? I do not think so. I am sure that if the governors find that we are genuinely expressing these views in the interest of the nation, and they agree with them, these ideas may appear in policy formulations albeit in a disguised version. So the primary motivation is NOT to influence, but to render some forms of wisdom from afar. To me that is the least we can do.

Please stop being so pessimistic. These brainstorming sessions are not monolithic, that is why they presented on a public Saro forum such as the Bintu, for general participation by our compatriots in diaspora in order to enable them to some sort of contribution to national development from afar.

Oodat geh yase for yerri, leh ee yerri. Oodat nor wan for yerri, nor for yerri! Ehn oodat geh yeye for see, leh ee see. We nor day force anybody for take we take on developmental issues.

Personally this is my motivation in starting these threads. No one is forced to adhere their own views to them. Pessimism is for losers.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #10 
Prof, my intent was not to dampen your enthusiasm but rather to provoke discussion on how diasporans can be more effective in influencing key decision makers and stake holders on the ground. I do not think diasporans have been that effective do you?
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #11 
"...but rather to provoke discussion on how diasporans can be more effective in influencing key decision makers and stake holders on the ground..." Spectator 007

So why did you camouflage your intention along these lines in a very forthright manner, as opposed to this round about way?

I mean, I do not want to put words in your proverbial "mouth", but you could start a thread about the pros and cons in the direction of the rights of diasporans to be able to cast votes in Saro elections

"... I do not think diasporans have been that effective do you?..."

I do not.

Dem wan we korppor but dem nor wan for gee we voting rights.

We for resist dis nothing for something anomaly in the psyche of we pipul dem, especially the politrikcians.
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #12 
Well noted Prof
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #13 
@ Lordamercy: You state and I quote:

"...What role does inward foreign direct investment (IFDI) have in this model?..."

What do you actually mean by that statement? Do you mean foreigners investing in Saro? The model is NOT precluding that possibility. The model is implying that we must take the initiative, and spearhead the drive in developing ways and means of doing the "woke" ourselves by establishing industries to help us capitalize on our natural resources so that we can sustainably create wealth for the nation, and not expect foreign entities to come in, invest, and generate wealth for their own nations and nationals at the detriment of poor Saro and her inhabitants as the case has been for over 200 years.

"...This analysis reads very much like a proposal for a closed economy..."

 So where has your "open" economy taken SL to, in past, at the present time, and into the future? Are we not still considered as one of the poorest nations in the global community? Bra lef nor!  

"...I think certain aspects of human endeavor should be left to the economists and political scientists..."

Did I preclude them from participating in this model? Certainly NOT! All hands on deck, appropriately.

Indeed, Lord please have mercy on the peoples of Saro.
LordaMercy
Reply with quote  #14 
 "So where has your "open" economy taken SL to, in past, at the present time, and into the future? Are we not still considered as one of the poorest nations in the global community? Bra lef nor! "  Sengbe.

Really Prof!

Almost all economies in the world are open economies.  An open economy is an economy that trades with the rest of the world.  It is also one in which funds can flow into and out of.  It is represented by the following identity:

Y = C + I + G + (X-M)

Where Y = national income
         C= Consumption demand (spending)
        I  = Business investment demand (spending)
       G = Government demand (spending)
      X  = exports
      M  = imports

 X-M is also equal to net exports or foreign demand (spending).  In other words, X-M is the international component of the identity, representing a country's economic interactions with the rest of the world.

Conversely, a closed economy is represented by the following identity:

              Y = C + I + G

Note that the international component (X-M) in the first identity is missing.  What this means is that a country with a closed economy has a gross domestic product  or aggregate demand that only counts on consumption spending, business investment spending and government spending.   Therefore, this would mean that all output is consumed or invested by the country's citizens or purchased by its government. 

The only economy that I can think of that comes close to the above identity (closed economy) is Brazil's.  This is because when we consider  the traditional macro-level measures of trade penetration, the measure of Brazil's exports and imports in GDP is small and insignificant.

Salone is considered a small open economy (SOE).  A small open economy is one that is small relative to its trading partners.  The implication of this is that such an economy cannot alter world prices, interest rates or incomes.  In other words, the economy is a price taker.  

Salone cannot afford to be a closed economy as international trade and inward foreign direct investment (IFDI) are necessary for growth.  It is also instructive that Salone cannot rely on domestic investment as wages are extremely low.  Low wages negatively affect domestic saving rates which in turn lead to low domestic investment rates. 

Remember when we had CFAO, BATA, PZ etc.? Our economy was the fastest growing in West Africa.  We started to spiral out of control when these foreign direct investors started leaving.  This was during Siaka Stevens' tenure in office.



 
 
 
Spectator 007
Reply with quote  #15 
Lordamercy dae release di cog!!!

Ar wan make Knice translate am for non-economist dem lek we, so man kin understand.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #16 
@ Lordamercy:

Now that you have broken it down like that, into the nitty-gritty, I am NOT advocating for a closed economy for Saro. Remember what I wrote:

"...The model is implying that we must take the initiative, and spearhead the drive in developing ways and means of doing the "woke" ourselves by establishing industries to help us capitalize on our natural resources so that we can sustainably create wealth for the nation, and not expect foreign entities to come in, invest, and generate wealth for their own nations and nationals at the detriment of poor Saro and her inhabitants as the case has been for over 200 years..."

Do you not agree with statement made above?

In any case, you are hired as the Chief Economist of Saro, with responsibilities in management, wealth-creation, value-addition, etc. when the natural resources are secured from the earth's crust by the Sojas, and the civilian employees in the nation.

Do you accept this position?

Thank you for acquiescing! 
LordaMercy
Reply with quote  #17 
Prof,

I restfully accept your job offer.  God bless.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #18 
@ Lordamercy:

Lordamercy, you are now the Chief Economist of the Saro Nation. In that capacity, how would you generate sustainable wealth for the nation when the Sojas and the civilian employees in the various sectors produce the mineral wealth we, as a nation, are endowed with as per the following speculative production levels:
1. Diamonds - a million carats of gem quality diamonds
2. Gold - half a million tons of gold
3. Rutile - another million tons
4. Iron Ore - 2 million tons
5. Uranium Ore (oh yes, we geh U na da contri day) - two hundred thousand tons of it.
6. Cocoa and Coffee - borcu tons
7. Fish - 2 million pounds of fish of various kinds.
8. Fruits and vegetables - borcu
9. Cows, goats and sheep - borcu
10. Tourism - one hundred thousand tourists per annum.

Wishful thinking, definitely. But how would Lordamercy in his capacity aforementioned convert the above into the korppor we need for sustainable development everlastingly?
LordaMercy
Reply with quote  #19 

Sengbe,

Do we have uranium?  Wow!!! When will Sengbe, Spectator 007, and DMK start working on our nuclear program?  LOL!!!

But seriously, there are benefits to owning a large natural resource base.  We can use our natural resources to increase our saving rates.  Saving more now leads to consuming more in the future.  And higher levels of saving, in general, lead to higher rates of investment and capital formation and by extension, economic growth.

Like Norway, we can avoid the natural resource curse, a phenomenon in economics that shows a contradictory relationship between natural resource wealth and economic performance. 

With prudent management, Norway has over the years avoided ostentatious spending on luxuries like supercars, designer handbag shops, exotic nightclubs, etc.  Instead, it has invested its oil and gas money in a giant sovereign wealth fund, a fund large enough to make every citizen of that country a millionaire in Norway’s currency, the kroner.

Thus, like Norway, we must be committed to an efficient resource allocation technique.  Accordingly, we can also use our minerals sector to effect a spillover effect on the non-minerals sector especially if we are committed to bridging the infrastructure gap and promoting the non-minerals sector. 

But we must develop a capacity for coordinated policy formation and execution.  Moreover, our management mechanisms must be sound and  we must recognize and embrace the significance of the relationship between the rule of law and economic development.

Empirical evidence abounds that no nation has developed without embracing the rule of law.  I use the term the rule of law in a multidimensional sense to encompass security of person, protection of property rights, checks on government power and control of corruption.   In a pragmatic sense, a lawless Salone does not respect any of these components of the rule of law.

It is also instructive that we recognize that commodity prices (prices of natural resources) do fluctuate in international markets and that such fluctuations or volatility, so to speak, can be amplified by production cycles and stoppages.  Thus, if our revenues are tied to natural resources, then we can expect our revenues to also fluctuate, thereby making development planning to be difficult.  So what should we do? 

We must not overspend on legacy projects like the proposed Mamamah international Airport in Port Loko district when commodity prices are rising in international markets.  That would plunge us into deficits and debts when prices start falling.  In other words, unnecessary spending and poor investments in boom periods heighten the probability of a sovereign debt crisis in periods of bust.

Sengbe
Reply with quote  #20 
Thank you very kindly for this wonderful exposition, Professor Lordamercy.

But how we go manage geh the korppor for do all den ting dem ya so way u don write bot so, after den Sojas ehn civilian employees go don pull the resources in the Earth's crust from the gron, fors ehn foremost?

TRANSLATION, please Bra, so that all man go understand.

The Professorship status I have bestowed upon you will be well-deserved, if you are not one already, if you can do us all this favor:

How we go mek this money/korppor/karla, way dem Sojas ehn civillians go don do den yone woke for the contri? Please use the wishful breakdown I employed yesterday for your exposition about extracting monetary gains from the sources in the various sectors mentioned.

Thanks in advance, Bra, or Ms. Lady, as the case may be.
LordaMercy
Reply with quote  #21 

Sengbe,

Interesting assignment.  I must start by establishing that my knowledge of minerals in Sierra Leone is limited to diamonds.  I was born and raised in Bo and as a student at CKC, I often had a great time hanging out at Gondama and Magbema on the banks of the Sewa river when school was on break.  The Sewa, as you may know, runs through the diamond fields of Bo district. 

So, it is my hope that my analysis of the economic benefits of diamonds to Sierra Leone can be generalized for all other minerals in that country.

By volume and value, Sierra Leone is the tenth largest producer of diamonds in the world.  Thus, in international trade theory, Sierra Leone is considered a large country relative to diamonds.  The implication of this is that Sierra Leone’s domestic trade policies can affect the world price of diamonds.  Unfortunately, in practice, this has not been the case because like all other economic activities, diamond production in Sierra Leone is mired in inefficiency and corruption.

Through taxation and profit sharing arrangements, the government of Sierra Leone earns significant revenues from the diamond industry.  However, the history of this industry has been fraught with worker exploitation and environmental destruction, not to mention the ravages of the civil war that produced “blood diamonds”.

Over the years, as corruption and negligence prevailed like a pestilence, successive governments have abdicated their responsibility to reinvest diamond funds in local communities.  This has resulted in endemic poverty and severe public health problems not only in diamond communities but also in the entire country.  So, what should we do?  To answer this question, let me draw on a question that you asked:

“But how we go manage geh the korppor for do all den ting dem ya so way u don write bot so, after den Sojas ehn civilian employees go don pull the resources in the Earth's crust from the gron, fors ehn foremost?”

Good question.  I would suggest that we start auctioning our diamonds in Freetown.  This strategy will call for a move away from the usual markets in the United Kingdom and Belgium where western oligarchs influence if not control all market activities.

 The Freetown auction must be operated by a government owned company.  This would force major global players in the diamond industry to descend regularly upon Freetown and even move some of their operations there.  With operations such as the cutting and the polishing of gems now taking place in Freetown on a grand scale, employment opportunities would be created for Sierra Leoneans.  Also, auctioning diamonds in Freetown would enable diamond revenues to stay within the borders of Sierra Leone. 

 As we become auctioneers, we will automatically assume the rights to determine the date and time to sell our diamonds.  This will create a sense of urgency with potential buyers thereby putting our gems in the spotlight for all to see.  Moreover, the auction will capture the momentum of the market thereby putting pressure on buyers to pay premium prices.   Thus, not only will we get top dollar for our gems in a market that will attract a vast number of potential global buyers but the process by its very nature will also eliminate all taxes, insurance and other costs that would be associated with selling in Europe.

Auctions stabilize market prices while maximizing the auctioneer's revenues.  It was the French economist, Leon Walras, who described the entire price mechanism as an auctioneer in 1880.  Thus, what later became known as the “Walrasian auctioneer” was simply a process that would call out a price to see how many buyers and sellers were there.  If these did not balance, the auctioneer would adjust price until demand equaled supply.

It follows that the competitive bidding associated with the auction process would allow the price of our gems to be negotiated upward.  But the process would also ensure that seller liability is limited. Consequently, while we will sell our diamonds “As -Is” with no warranties other than the title, the process would also eliminate the likelihood of financing or repairs.  

The implication of the foregoing is that if we are a big player in the global diamond industry, then we must act like one.  But of course, we must on the same token fully embrace the rule of law and recognize its significance in economic growth and development.  This will help us realize the gains that accrue from the production and sale of our minerals.

 

DMK
Reply with quote  #22 
Thank you @LordaMercy for the detailed and brilliant description. I'm sure you know Botswana a few years ago did exactly that you propose and they are today reaping the benefits. The tourism industry there is booming. Global players in the diamond business have all opened offices there creating jobs. Many hotels have sprung up and restaurants are packed with paying customers.

I understand we did try to auction that big diamond in Freetown but the reserve price was not reached. The decision has therefore been made to move the auction to Europe. If this is true then it's a shame. It could have been the beginnings of our very own diamond exchange. 

Ps. Botswana too found a large diamond in 2016 that failed to reach the reserve price. Last news I read was that it has been placed on hold for now to be sold later.
Sengbe
Reply with quote  #23 
Lai-e-lai! Professor Lordamercy is a very brilliant CKC man. That coming from a Bo School man is a very big compliment. I hope he takes it in that light.

This is the type of intellectual discourse I am in favor of on the Bintu. But some gbose-gbose m/fckers always interject their thuggish attitude into such discussions to camouflage their gross inadequacies in their abilities to contribute intellectually by bringing in defaming topics in order to dampen the enthusiasm of said intellectuals so that they can veer away from the salient points in the discussions - they know themselves. But we will NEVER allow them to have the upper hand in this regard. We must always defeat them intellectually, and the means (rudeness) they usually employ to obviate our enthusiastic approach in offering our wisdom to the governors on the ground from afar.

In krio they say: bra trokey wan box but ee han too short. On the Bintu we say: if you cannot compete in intellectual discourse; shut the phock up, and do not expose your gross illiteracy for all to read.

Ndakei, Prof. Lordamercy, nya na liima class hun, ga ya ma kor gi bi ansa more fully. Furthermore, please consider changing your moniker to one that befits your vast intellect. Kethamia!!
ABK
Reply with quote  #24 
Sengbe, make no attempt to portray yourself as an intellectual. The closer you came to being one is no more than an intellectual fool. Your usual showy pretenses to knowledge, ability and discipline grossly contradicts your behavior among people half your age. Simply said, you are a charlatan! This was you in real time and no excuses will redeem you from this without an apology; something no one expects from you but are willing to ask Bra Cornie to publicly apologize to Sage.

"Why unu fashin me ba? Ar hab unu Mama dem?"  Sengbe
 

Sengbe
Reply with quote  #25 
I DID NOT EVEN FINISH MAKING MY POINT AND HERE COMES ONE OF THOSE M/FCKERS I WAS TALKING ABOUT.

If I am a "charlatan" then what are you? you obnoxious simpleton!!

I will NOT apologize to anyone for asking a question. In the same vein, I will ask you the same question if you fashin me on the Bintu.

Bra Cornie's apology yielded the needed dividend, and we have moved on.

You need to mind your own bloody business mfcker!! I was talking to Lordamercy, not you!!!
ABK
Reply with quote  #26 
"Why unu fashin me ba? Ar hab unu Mama dem?"

LORD HAVE MERCY UPON YOU!
ABK
Reply with quote  #27 
"Why unu fashin me ba? Ar hab unu Mama dem?"

"I will NOT apologize to anyone for asking a question." 


You are a sick man!

Sengbe
Reply with quote  #28 
@ Lordamercy:

"...I would suggest that we start auctioning our diamonds in Freetown..."

How about Koidu/Sefadu, or Kenema? Very close to the source/region where diamonds are extracted in abundance. Freetown is very congested and dirty even though it is the capital city.

We need to populate the cities formerly mentioned with these foreign business folks in the diamond industry, and fully employ their inhabitants so that they can also benefit from the fruits of the soil in their homelands.

@DMK:

Bra you take the word out of me moth about what is being done in Botswana. More power to them over there. Maybe we shall/will follow the example they are setting, I pray.
Alaki Sengbe
Reply with quote  #29 
This old Mende pa is all over Bintumani now soliciting forumites to respond to him. This is after he rubbed kaka all over himself. Old papa please go spend time with the grand kids as Bintumanians have seen the real alaki Sengbe's true colors. Hehehehe! 
LordaMercy
Reply with quote  #30 
Sengbe,

Thanks for the nice words.  We all should be thankful to you for initiating thought- provoking discussions.   You wrote:


"How about Koidu/Sefadu, or Kenema? Very close to the source/region where diamonds are extracted in abundance. Freetown is very congested and dirty even though it is the capital city."  Sengbe 

Yes, I agree that Freetown is congested and dirty.  Ideally, Bo should be the center for my suggested economic activities.  While other towns/cities have deteriorated badly over the years, Bo has shown a remarkable growth potential.  

Bo is now a university town with two large Njala University campuses located in Towama and Kowama.   And the night life is fantastic.   But being a Bo Town guy, I thought it would not be politically correct to choose Bo as a center of a major economic transformation in Sierra Leone.

@ DMK, thanks.  Yes, I have followed with great interest the economic transformation of Botswana.  Their diamond industry is relatively new compared to ours.  

Diamonds were discovered in Botswana in 1967.  But relative to Salone, Botswana has made better use of her resources as political stability and democratic norms have guided her growth trajectory since independence in 1966.
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